Mayor: Water enough for new development

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By Geri Corey
— The Village of Goshen is growing to include an expanded development, known as Harness Estates, as well as a brewery, called Kikkerfrosch. And looming in the future is the possibility of a cancer center.

With growth like this on the threshold — and the village’s history of water problems — Village Mayor Kyle Roddey assures citizens that water supply is being carefully monitored.

Two reservoirs — Prospect Reservoir and Greenhill Reservoir, which combined the mayor refers to as “the reservoir” — make up the village’s full time permanent water source. During times of drought, when the reservoir falls below level, the mayor may call a water emergency. When a water emergency is called, one or both of two things happen: the village has the legal ability to use the CRV well and village residents may be subjected to water restrictions. The CRV wells are currently being used only during water emergencies.

“They’re only there for as a supplemental water source,” said the mayor.

However, based on Goshen’s history of draughts, the village’s long-term plan is to make the CRV wells an additional full-time water source. On the average day, villagers use slightly under one million gallons of water. Once the CRV wells are hooked up, the village is permitted by the Department of Environmental Conservation and the Orange County Department of Health to use 1.3 million gallons of water a day.

“All decisions regarding growth are based on potential future village build-out. We never take on new customers that would cause a decrease in service quality for residents’ water and sewer,” Mayor Roddey explained, adding, “The 1.3 million gallons a day will cover current usage, the brewery, and additional commercial and residential build-out.”

Roddey said that before village officials make any decision regarding infrastructure, both the village engineer and the village attorney are consulted. He added that no customer gets preferential treatment in the water system.

Knowing the village need for an additional water source, officials began hunting years ago for a supplementary supply, well before the brewery purchased the village owned land on Route 17M.

Since the CRV wells are related to an underground aquifer, using them will eliminate dependency on weather conditions, like rainfall and evaporation, that plague reservoirs.

Said the mayor, “When the CRV wells are hooked up, residents will be less susceptible to water restrictions.”

Village growth, especially commercial, will aid in helping the economy. The mayor uses the sewer bills that escalated with the construction in 2006 of the wastewater treatment plant and the high cost of the removal and then relocation of the village landfill as examples.

“Our ability to bring down costs is based almost exclusively on bringing in new customers. Any new customer will want water and sewer,” he commented.

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